History

History is who we are and why we are the way we are. David McCullough (American historian)

 

Why teach history?

The study of our history is a way to put the pieces of the past together and show how we came to be where we are today.  

 

Studying history can provide us with insight into our origins as well as cultures with which we might be less familiar, thereby increasing cross-cultural awareness and understanding.

 

History is full of fantastic stories to enrich and delight, and to foster a desire for knowledge – the changes in Britain brought about by Alfred the Great; the antics of Henry VIII and his six wives: the legacy left to the modern world by the Ancient Greeks; the rise of fascism in 1930s Europe.

  

How do we teach history?

At Bude Primary Academy, we teach history as a discrete subject, which contributes to a wider project focus each half term. We use Curriculum Maestro across the school to ensure the History National Curriculum is covered in full, through innovative and engaging topics. The vast majority of our projects have a history aspect, and at least one half-termly project will have history at its core.

 

What difference does learning about history make?

History is a vital part of a well-rounded education. It allows pupils to explore, question and to understand the past and its impact.

 

Children will develop the key history skills, which include the following:

  • develop an understanding of change and how the society we live in came to be. The past causes the present, and so the future. 
  • develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • make connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • ask and answer historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • carry out research that involves thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.